• Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month

  • All Art Content

    Resource

    Resource Type

    Link

    Description

    Grade(s)

    ArtsEdge

    Articles, lesson and unit plans and videos, music

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    Through the Kennedy Arts Center. Provides videos, lessons and unit plans and performances for all arts content areas that covers a wide array of topics, themes and cultures. Also provides cross content material as well.

    ECE - 12

  • Library Services

    Resource

    Resource Type

    Link

    Description

    Grade(s)

    Asian/Pacific Islander Authors: Sora eBook and audiobook collection

    Ebooks and audiobooks from Denver Public Schools' Sora digital library.

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    Sora collection highlighting authors from East and South Asian countries as well as Americans who identify as Asian and/or Pacific Islander.

    ECE-12

    History Liberated: Sora eBook and audiobook collection

    Ebooks and audiobooks from Denver Public Schools' Sora digital library.

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    Sora collection highlighting the perspectives of historically marginalized groups to provide a well-rounded view of our nation's past and present.

    ECE-12

    Asian Pacific Author & Illustrator Literacy Units

    A variety of resources to celebrate authors, illustrators, books, etc. for librarians to share with teachers and school communities. Also a resource for librarians to create culturally responsive libraries.

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    Units feature information for author studies and illustrator spotlights; video links, educator resource links; some ideas for lessons and art activities; links to music and culture; and ideas for book displays, plus more. More content will be added throughout the year. Three authors/illustrators are featured per unit.

    K-12

    List of Asian Pacific Authors & Illustrators

    List of Asian Pacific authors & illustrators to assist in the promotion of a culturally responsive library program.

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    Click on the author/illustrator name and it links you to their home page or a website that features that particular person. On the list 3 books featured per name. Contains information on checking out Sora eBooks.

    K-12

About Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month

  • May is Asian American and Pacific American Heritage Month. The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of Asian and Pacific Islanders who have enriched America's history and are instrumental in its future success. Learn More >>


    Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month: VanTrinh’s Story

    Published on dpsk12.org, May 3, 2021

    One morning, my mother stopped me before I left for school. She told my sister and I to go with a family friend on the bus. My mother kept telling my sister and I to keep an eye out for each other, to be careful, and that she loved us very much. She put the photo I took in front of the Virgin Mary statue outside of the cathedral into my shirt pocket—to keep me safe since she could not come with me. I kept telling her, “It’s alright, Mom, go home.” But my mother stayed nearby until the bus left. 

    I was 12 and my sister was 17. That was the last time we saw our mother for over ten years.

    The bus took us out of the city into the countryside; we had many stops and it took all day before we made it to Vietnam’s southernmost province. I had left my hometown of Saigon for the first time in my life. In the dead of night, we went out in a tiny fisherman boat on to the river that took us to a slightly bigger boat filled with 53 other people. We were escaping Vietnam.

    In the year of 1979, after the Fall of Saigon, this was an act of treason. And those who left were no longer allowed back into the country. My sister and I became one of the Vietnamese Boat People: political refugees seeking sanctuary. For every ten boats that left Vietnam, three boats would make it to a refugee camp. If you made it past the Vietnamese navy and pirates, you would have to survive the endless ocean. We became people without a country to return to.

    As a high ranking officer in the South Vietnam Army and a part of the American Air Force, my father was put into a concentration camp when South Vietnam (Republic of Vietnam) fell to North Vietnam (Socialist Republic of Vietnam). Anyone with previous support for South Vietnam and its ideals were punished harshly: their children could not go to school, families lost their homes, people could not work, and everyday, the atrocities continued to get worse. Knowing this, my mother weighed the kind of life her children would have in Vietnam versus looking for freedom and opportunity in a new country—even if it meant sending them out to sea with little more than prayers. She decided the risk was better than a life with no future. Read More >>